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Financial Planning & Retirement News Seminars

Retirement Seminar & Wealth Management

Retirement Couple

Are you ready for the “Big R” ?

Feb. 24th
CPCU Norwich, 202 Salem Turnpike, Norwich


Retirement Seminar & Wealth Management Participants will learn:

  • How to confidently address the financial, lifestyle and emotional transitions to retirement.
  • How to guard against risks and manage those that are inevitable.
  • Whether they are ready for retirement.

For more information please contact:

Jay Noyes, Financial Advisor
CorePlus Financial Planning & Retirement Services
860-885-3679 office
[email protected]

or

Holland Rajaniemi, Associate Financial Advisor
CorePlus Financial Planning & Retirement Services
860-885-3680
[email protected]

 

 

 

Categories
Financial Planning & Retirement News

A Retirement Fact Sheet

Reality of retirement


Some specifics about the “second act.”

 Provided by Holland Rajaniemi

Does your vision of retirement align with the facts? Here are some noteworthy financial and lifestyle facts about life after 50 that might surprise you. 

Up to 85% of a retiree’s Social Security income can be taxed. Some retirees are taken aback when they discover this. In addition to the Internal Revenue Service, 13 states currently levy taxes on some or all Social Security retirement benefits: Colorado, Connecticut, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Mexico, North Dakota, Rhode Island, Utah, Vermont, and West Virginia. (West Virginia, incidentally, is phasing out such taxation.)1

Retirees get a slightly larger standard deduction on their federal taxes. Actually, this is true for all taxpayers aged 65 and older, whether they are retired or not. Right now, the standard deduction for a single filer in this age bracket is $13,850, compared to $12,200 for those 64 or younger. It is scheduled to rise to $14,050 in 2020.2

Retirees can still use IRAs to save for retirement. There is no age limit for contributing to a Roth IRA, as long as the owner earns income. So, a retiree can keep directing money into a Roth IRA for life, provided they are not earning too much. A senior can potentially contribute to a traditional IRA until the year they turn 70½.3

A significant percentage of retirees are carrying big debts. Looking at data from the Federal Reserve’s triennial Surveys of Consumer Finances, the median debt of senior households (age 65+) has more than doubled since the start of the century.4

The most stressful debt for seniors, according to a 2019 study from Ohio State University researchers, is credit card debt. The study calculates that each new dollar of credit card debt taken on by a senior household creates financial stress approximating an additional $14-20 of home loan debt.4

Moreover, a sudden financial liability may delay retirement. Another 2019 study, co-authored by researchers from the Urban Institute and the Congressional Budget Office, looks at the potential impact of a new $10,000 debt on an individual between 55-70 years old carrying the median amount of credit card debt for their age. The researchers concluded that this jump in debt would make a baby boomer 9% more likely to put off retiring.4

Fewer seniors live alone than you may think. The Administration for Community Living (a federal agency) says around 14% of older adults (65+) live by themselves. With millennials living at home and blended and extended families becoming common, perhaps this is not so surprising. The ACL does note that nearly half of women older than age 75 are on their own.5

Just 15% of women say they have a retirement strategy set down in writing. This factoid comes from the 2019 Transamerica Retirement Survey of American Workers. Another 42% say they have unwritten strategies. The remaining 43%? No strategy at all.6

Few older Americans budget for travel expenses. While retirees certainly love to travel, a Merrill Lynch study says that only about a third of people aged 50 and older earmark funds for their trips.7

What financial facts should you consider as you retire? What monetary realities might you need to acknowledge as your retirement progresses from one phase to the next? The reality of retirement may surprise you. If you have not met with a financial professional about your retirement savings and income needs, you may wish to do so. When it comes to retirement, the more information you have, the better.

Holland Rajaniemi Holland Rajaniemi, Associate Financial Advisor,
can speak with you regarding options available
for your retirement plans.

 

CPCU Financial Services

To set a no-cost, no-obligation appointment, call 
Holland Rajaniemi at (860) 885-3680. 

 

*CorePlus Financial Planning and Retirement Services Advisors are registered representatives of CUNA Brokerage Services, Inc.

Representatives are registered, securities sold, advisory services offered through CUNA Brokerage Services, Inc. (CBSI), member FINRA/SIPC, a registered broker/dealer and investment advisor, which is not an affiliate of the credit union. CBSI is under contract with the financial institution to make securities available to members. Not NCUA/NCUSIF/FDIC insured, May Lose Value, No Financial Institution Guarantee. Not a deposit of any financial institution. 

This material was prepared by MarketingPro, Inc., and does not necessarily represent the views of the presenting party, nor their affiliates. This information has been derived from sources believed to be accurate. Please note – investing involves risk, and past performance is no guarantee of future results. The publisher is not engaged in rendering legal, accounting or other professional services. If assistance is needed, the reader is advised to engage the services of a competent professional. This information should not be construed as investment, tax or legal advice and may not be relied on for avoiding any Federal tax penalty. This is neither a solicitation nor recommendation to purchase or sell any investment or insurance product or service, and should not be relied upon as such. All indices are unmanaged and are not illustrative of any particular investment.

Citations:

1 – aarp.org/retirement/social-security/questions-answers/how-is-ss-taxed.html [4/9/19]
2 – efile.com/tax-deduction/federal-standard-deduction/ [12/4/19]
3 – investopedia.com/ask/answers/03/120403.asp [11/8/19]
4 – nextavenue.org/retirement-older-americans-debt/ [8/9/19]
5 – forbes.com/sites/howardgleckman/2018/05/04/a-new-snapshot-of-older-adults-in-the-us/ [5/4/18]
6 – transamericacenter.org/docs/default-source/women-and-retirement/tcrs2019_op_women_and_retirement_fact_sheet.pdf [11/19]
7 – kiplinger.com/article/retirement/T037-C032-S014-5-surprising-facts-to-know-about-retirement.html [11/11/19]

NCUA  Equal Housing Lender

Categories
Financial Planning & Retirement News

Leaving Your Job? Your Retirement Savings Plan Options

Advisor-News-Retirement

Are you leaving your job and considering whether to take a distribution from your 401(k), 403(b), or governmental 457(b) plan? if so, make sure you’ve considered all your options.

In general, you have the following four options when you’re eligible to receive a distribution from your employer retirement savings plan.1

Option 1: Leave the money in the plan

This is the easiest option — you don’t do anything at all.

  • Continued tax-deferred growth (or potentially tax-free growth in the case of Roth accounts)
  • While IRAs typically provide more investment choices than an employer plan, there may be certain investment opportunities in your particular plan that you can’t replicate with an IRA
  • You can receive penalty-free distributions as early as age 55 (50 for qualified public safety employees) compared with age 59-1/2 for IRAs
  • Qualified plans generally provide greater creditor protection than IRAs

Note: This may not be an option if your vested plan balance is $5,000 or less; if you’ve reached your plan’s normal retirement age; or if the payment is a required minimum distribution. Consult your plan’s terms.

Option 2: No rollover — take the distribution in cash (and securities if applicable)

Most plans allow you to take a lump-sum distribution of your account balance.

  • Defeats the primary purpose of your plan — saving money for retirement; you risk not having enough money at retirement to cover your expenses
  • All or part of your distribution may be subject to federal (and possibly state) taxes, and the taxable portion may be subject to an additional 10% early distribution penalty tax if you haven’t reached age 55 (50 for qualified public safety employees); (this may significantly reduce the amount you’ll actually receive)
  • You’ll lose the benefit of continued tax-deferred (or tax-free) growth

Note: If your distribution includes employer stock or other securities, special tax rules may apply that can make taking a distribution more advantageous than making a rollover. Consult a tax professional.

Option 3: Roll the funds over to an IRA

Distributions from designated Roth accounts can be rolled over only to a Roth IRA; distributions of non-Roth funds can be made to a traditional IRA or “converted” to a Roth IRA.

  • Continued tax-deferred (or tax-free) growth
  • Generally more investment choices with an IRA than with an employer plan
  • You can freely move your money among the various investments offered by your IRA trustee, and you can freely move your IRA dollars among different IRA trustees/custodians (using direct transfers)
  • With an IRA, the timing and amount of distributions are generally at your discretion (however you must start taking required minimum distributions from traditional IRAs at age 70-1/2)
  • No required distributions must be made from Roth IRAs during your lifetime

Option 4: Roll the funds over to your new employer’s plan (if the plan accepts rollovers)

  • Has all of the advantages of Option 1, above
  • Can consolidate your employer plan retirement savings
  • You may be eligible for a plan loan, and you may be able to delay required distributions beyond age 70-1/2

One of the most common questions people ask is: Should I roll over my retirement money to an IRA or to another employer’s retirement plan? Assuming both options are available to you, there is no right or wrong answer to this question. There are strong arguments to be made on both sides. You need to weigh all of the factors and make a decision based on your own needs and priorities.2

When evaluating whether to initiate a rollover, always be sure to (1) ask about possible surrender charges that may be imposed by your existing employer plan, or new surrender charges that your IRA or new plan may impose; (2) compare investment fees and expenses charged by your IRA (and investment funds) or new plan with those charged by your existing employer plan (if any); and (3) understand any accumulated rights or guarantees that you may be giving up by transferring funds out of your employer plan. It is best to have a professional assist you with this, because the decision you make may have significant consequences — both now and in the future.

Keep in mind that you don’t have to roll over your entire distribution. You can roll over whatever portion you wish. If you roll over only part of a distribution that includes taxable and nontaxable amounts, the amount you roll over is treated as coming first from the taxable part of the distribution.

1 Special rules apply if you’re the beneficiary of a plan participant.

2 If your distribution is eligible for rollover, you’ll receive a statement from your employer outlining your rollover options. Read that statement carefully. You cannot roll over hardship withdrawals, required minimum distributions, substantially equal periodic payments, corrective distributions, and certain other payments.

Holland Rajaniemi Holland Rajaniemi, Associates Financial Advisor,
can speak with you regarding options available
for your retirement plans.

 

CPCU Financial Services

 

To set a no-cost, no-obligation appointment, call 
Holland Rajaniemi at (860) 885-3680. 

 

*CorePlus Financial Planning and Retirement Services Advisors are registered representatives of CUNA Brokerage Services, Inc.

Representatives are registered, securities sold, advisory services offered through CUNA Brokerage Services, Inc. (CBSI), member FINRA/SIPC, a registered broker/dealer and investment advisor, which is not an affiliate of the credit union. CBSI is under contract with the financial institution to make securities available to members. Not NCUA/NCUSIF/FDIC insured, May Lose Value, No Financial Institution Guarantee. Not a deposit of any financial institution. 

NCUA  Equal Housing Lender

PLEASE READ CAREFULLY
BEFORE YOU APPLY.

In order to process your application, you must answer the question below. Questions answered dishonestly will result in your application being denied.

 

 

 

Are you a current member of CorePlus Credit Union or do you live, work, or worship in New London County, Connecticut or Windham County, Connecticut?